The sights and scents of spring seduce the senses for but a short period of time. As each new cluster of blossoms take shape, a new set dies away. One of my absolute favorite fragrances of  spring-time splendor is the Korean Spice Viburnum  (Viburnum carlesii).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

My first encounter with this overwhelmingly seductive blossom was back in my college days, walking through the labyrinth of paths that led to class. Spring had a remarkable way of lifting the spirits of the stress-filled college student consumed with papers, exams, and deadlines. Fortunately, landscaping was a priority at my University. No matter which path I took, there was a special batch of color and fragrance to welcome me, creating a beautiful, momentary amnesia that made me smile.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Korean Spice Viburnum was rather large on this campus, but by allowing the larger growth, it produced more blooms, filling the air with an exotically spicy scent. I actually passed by it for a couple of years before finally identifying the species. But I admit to snagging a couple of blossoms on my way to class to get my spring fix prior to being trapped inside the classroom.

Despite being long away from my alma mater, I still spot this variety in my spring travels, and am even lucky enough to have several outside of my office. As a woody-stemmed species, picking blossoms can be tricky, but with enough effort, and fingernails, you can easily fill a vase…or teapot… with these delightful spring ambassadors. As for their spring endurance, their sweet, but spicy, aroma can last for days indoors, and the proliferation of blooms on one large bush is rather sequential, providing a longer enjoyment over the spring season.

Of course, there is no better way to display these spring beauties than in a small teapot. With each blossom stem only being a couple of inches long, I opted for a small “bachelor teapot” from the early 19th century. A black basalt variety that was purchased in England, with the marking “Cyples” on the bottom, indicating a company that produced products in Staffordshire for a only a few decades. I adore the strength and beauty of black basalt or basaltes ware. Originally, it was advertised as “indestructible” since it is fashioned from ground stone and glass to provide a more durable product. My little beauty here has a couple of chips on the lid, which allows me to see the internal construction of a very fine black grain – not a black glaze over other material.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I will cover black basalt pottery in future posts as I have more than one teapot to share, and feel these unique items should be more appreciated. Besides, there is an intriguing connection between the black basalt popularity and archaeology of the time…stay tuned!

P.S. Behind the Scenes:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFor those of you with cats….you can understand the challenge of snapping a few photos within their domain! I know it was curiosity only, but hope the scent of spring gave them something new to enjoy as well. Cheers to a ‘scentsational’ spring!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s